Bicol 2013 Part 2 – Calaguas

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Going to Calaguas was probably the most anticipated part of our Bicol trip. I had read much about how much of a beautiful paradise the island is and was really looking forward to seeing and experiencing it for myself. We had a run in with really bad weather in Legazpi, so we were so glad that we were blessed with clear skies on the day we went to Calaguas.

Getting to paradise was one of the biggest challenges of the trip. Coming from Legazpi, we had to take the two hour van ride back to Naga because there were no direct vans from Legazpi to Calaguas. From Naga, we rode the van headed to Daet – another two hours – followed by a 45 minute van ride to Paracale, where the port for the boat ride to Calaguas Island were located. We arrived in Paracale at 5 PM so we decided not to continue on to Calaguas until the morning because it was a scary thought to be lost at sea at night. Also, the boatmen were hesitant on taking people to the island because the trip would take another hour and a half! Basically, it would take almost 7 hours to get from Legazpi to Calaguas!

Since we had read that there are no restaurants, no hotels, no electricity and no signal in Calaguas, we had to buy our food and supplies from the Paracale market place before heading over to the hotel to rest after nearly 5 hours of travel.

View as we approached calaguas

The next morning, we headed to the port. We were able to befriend one of the residents while doing our supply shopping and she was able to provide a boat for us for only 2,000 Php (all in, both ways! There were just two of us so we paid 1,000 each. Not bad considering the rates that we saw being posted on other websites). We left at 7 am and arrived a little past 8, and Calaguas definitely did NOT disappoint. There were other people on the beach but it still felt that we had the entire beach to ourselves. The water was so clean, so blue, so cold – that I spent almost the entire day just submerged in the water (I left Calaguas five skin tones darker).

On our little fisherman’s boat

If you want to get away from everything, Calaguas is definitely the place to go. No electricity, no WiFi, no mobile signal – just you and the beach. Of course there are some bigger sacrifices that had to be made. First of all, there was no decent bathrooms. There was no flush and you had to pay P10 per bucket of water for flushing and for taking a bath. Second, there were no hotels, no soft beds, no night lights. We spent the night in a tent. This wasn’t much of a problem since the sand was really comfortable to sleep on and I managed to sleep for a solid 10 hours.

With our backpacks and our tent!

With our backpacks and our tent!

After spending an entire day in paradise, we experienced probably one of the most frightening moments of my life – I’m not even exaggerating. Our boatmen woke us up at around 6 am by telling us “Neng, tayo nalang ang tao sa isla. May bagyo. Signal #2 (Girls, we are the only ones left on the island. There’s a storm – signal #2)” We bolted up and haphazardly packed up our tent and jumped onto the boat. All this within 10 minutes. The waves were turbulent. We were being rocked and pushed on the ocean and it was terrifying because we were riding a small fishermen’s boat that, with enough wave strength, could just capsize in any moment. It was like riding Log Jam but on a real ocean. Fifteen minutes into the trip, our fingers started to prune up from all the water that splashed us from the ocean, as well as the rain that was pouring from the sky. We could barely see anything in our surroundings. Both of us were heavily praying that our boatmen knew were to go. Thankfully, they did. We managed to reach the shore after two hours in the water. Props to our boatmen. They really did an amazing job navigating the small boat in the crazy waves and almost 0 visibility skies.

Despite this nerve-wrecking near death experience getting back to Paracale, I would not hesitate to go back to Calaguas. It’s that kind of natural beauty that you shouldn’t experience just once in your life. I’m being cheesy but the pictures don’t do any justice to how beautifully serene the island is in person. I would definitely do it all over for another day in paradise.

Gorgeous sunset in Calaguas <3

Gorgeous sunset in Calaguas ❤

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Bicol 2013 Part 1 – Legazpi

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On the first week of August, my good friend Kath and I spent five days in Bicol. I know, i know – it’s smack in the middle of typhoon season and we went to a region that was on the path of the storms. We expected that so the mid-day showers throughout our trip was no surprise for us. In fact, it added to the adventure and excitement of our trip!

We arrived in the Naga Airport with our backpacks on our backs and a mix of excitement and nervousness. We hadn’t completely structured our trip so we would be playing it by ear. After stopping by SM Naga for lunch and supplies, we rode the van headed to Legazpi. The van terminal was just across SM Naga and the ride was just a bit over two hours. Just like in my Siem Reap trip, we hadn’t booked a hotel so we asked our tricycle driver for his recommendation. We ended up staying in Night & Day, a newly opened budget hostel, for 600 pesos (300 pesos each) – not a bad deal as the room had air conditioning, a television, and two decent sized beds.

Since we only allotted one day to explore Legazpi, once we settled in our room, we headed out to see the sights. Our first stop was the Cagsawa Ruins. To our disappointment, the skies were pretty cloudy so we did not have the perfect view of the Mayon Volcano that we went to Legazpi for. Nonetheless, the Cagsawa Ruins are beautiful on their own merit, with or without a perfect image of Mayon in the shot. A few minutes into our picture taking session, it started to rain. We decided to continue our tour in the morning before leaving Legazpi.

Cagsawa Ruins

Giant cloud blocking Mayon

Raining!

Posing in the rain :))

We had dinner in Waway’s Restaurant because we were enticed by the 250 Pesos buffet that they advertised. It did not disappoint. For dessert, we headed for 1st Colonial Grill to try out their Sili (chili) and Pili ice creams. The Pili ice cream was delicious! The sili ice cream was definitely an experience. When it touches your tongue, you start to think, ah this tastes really good! But the moment it gets to your throat you feel the aftereffect of the spicy flavor in the ice cream.

Sili Ice Cream

On the way out of the restaurant, it started to pour. We didn’t have any umbrellas so we asked for plastic bags. They gave us the small grocery bags and just as we were running out with just the plastic bag over our heads, the very kind staff of 1st Colonial Grill approached us with giant garbage bags and made makeshift raincoats for us!

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That evening, we found out our college classmate and friend, Kat, was on her way back to Legazpi for the long weekend so we made plans to meet up. The next morning, Kat picked us up from the hostel and after having breakfast in another buffet that was beside the airport, we went to Lignon Hill for a view of Mayon. This time, the sky was kind to us and we were able to view the Mayon Volcano in its entirety.

With Kat!

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Lignon Hill

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Posing in front of Mayon

The other side of Lignon Hill

Finally having seen Mayon, we decided it was time to go to our next destination: Calaguas. So we bid goodbye to Kat and rode the van back to Naga. Getting wet in the rain in Legazpi was just the beginning of our rainy Bicol adventure!

Cambodia 2013: The Weekend Backpacking Experience

A few months ago, I wrote down my travel priority list. I’m proud to say that I have finally crossed out one from my list: to see the sun rise behind Angkor Wat.

Angkor Wat Sunrise

The trip to Cambodia is definitely the most exciting and adventurous trip I have had so far. For starters, it was a very impulsive trip – most of the planning happened the night before. Mar and I discussed about going to Siem Reap on my last weekend in Thailand but we never really took the time to arrange the itinerary. We had a list of places we wanted to see and do, and less the 48 hours to accomplish it. Also, it was my first real backpacking trip to a different country!

We left the hotel at 5:00 am to catch the 5:30 bus to Aranyaprathet. Our entire trip was anchored on the assumption that we will find the casino bus at Lumpini Park, just as we had read on travel blogs. After several minutes of walking, we found the bus that was headed to Aranyaprathet! It was a five hour drive to the border but considering that we were headed to a totally different country, the bus ride did not feel that long. The bus was comfortable, so it was really not a stressful journey.

at the Cambodian boder

The bus arrived at the border at around 10:00 and we finally made it across to Cambodia where we were welcomed by a man offering free shuttle services to the transport building. At first it seemed a bit sketchy. We’ve read enough travel blogs to know that there are a lot of scams in the Thailand-Cambodia border, but we still went along with them. Thankfully, they got us to the transport building safely and we got on a shared taxi to Siem Reap. The taxi cost $12 per person for four people. We shared our taxi with two really nice American girls who had also been working in Thailand. It was a two hour drive to Siem Reap so we got to share a lot of stories with them while in transit.

We got to Siem Reap at around 1PM where a tuktuk was already waiting for us – very clever strategy for the locals. While we were seated in the tuktuk, we automatically got ourselves a tour organizer who offered to book everything for us. Given that we didn’t have any concrete plans, we just went with what he was saying. It probably would have been cheaper to have booked everything – the tuktuk driver, taxi to the border, etc., before heading to Cambodia. Nonetheless, it was comforting to know that everything else was already set for our overnight stay in Siem Reap.

On our tuktuk

They took us to a really budget (read:cheap) hotel that was a short walk from Pub Street. It was a bit sketchy and dark but it was also complete so we decided to stay there. While Mar and I were talking about the hotel on the way back to Bangkok, we both were actually a bit scared of the place at some point of our stay. I actually felt like I was in a slasher film waiting to happen! Well, at least we got out fine, but it honestly isn’t a place I would highly recommend people to stay in.

We headed to Pub Street for lunch. There are so many restaurants to choose from and I guess one of the sad things about staying there for only the weekend was that we weren’t able to try as many restaurants as we could have. We decided to eat at a pretty restaurant, the Kmher Family Restaurant. Their food did not disappoint.

After lunch, we finally headed to Angkor to get our day pass and witness the beautiful sunset at Phnom Bakheng. We had to climb a hill to get there, which was quite a challenge for me, but it was definitely worth it because I was able to witness this:

Sunset at Phnom Bakheng

Walking down the hill from Phnom Bakheng

It was a beautiful sight and definitely a prelude to what we would be seeing the next day.

We woke up early to see the Angkor Wat sunrise, but even at 5:30 am, there was already a huge crowd waiting to see it as well. No matter how many pictures of it I’ve seen online, it was still such a majestic sight to see. Nothing can replace seeing such a wonderful sight in person. Once the sun showed itself at around 7 am, we went into Angkor Wat. There weren’t that many people yet so we took advantage of taking pictures that didn’t include other people. On our way out of Angkor Wat, at around 9:30, was we saw the mass of people headed inside.

Mar amidst the crowds in Angkor Wat

We spent the entire morning exploring the Angkor Complex. We weren’t able to go to the smaller temples because we had to leave for Thailand at 4pm. We got to go to Angkor Thom where we spent most of our time at the Bayon Temple. We visited the Tomb Raider temple, Ta Prohm and lastly we went to Bantay Srei. By this time, I’ve been to several temples within 10 days but I didn’t feel too templed out. I guess it’s because all the temples I’ve seen were all different from each other.

The Thailand-Cambodia border closes at 8PM so we had to rush back in order to make it before it closes because my flight back home was at 11 am the next day. This was probably the most stressful part of our trip. Our taxi driver arrived late and on the way to the border he started picking up other people despite the fact that we paid for the full taxi. It started raining really hard as we were nearing the border and by the time we made it, it was flooding! Our taxi driver didn’t understand our need to be dropped off at a place where there was a shade so we made a run for it. It was 7:15 pm. Forty five minutes before the closing of the borders. There wasn’t much shelter between the borders so by the time we got to Thailand, we were both soaking wet!! We almost didn’t make it to the bus, but thankfully there were still some last minute seats available. After missing our stop, we eventually found our way to Bangkok thanks to a friendly Thai man who would not leave until we got a taxi that would take us home and use a meter. We got home with wet clothes on our back and a hell of a story to share. 

It was a crazy adventure. Sure, there were unfortunate moments towards the end but I would never trade it for anything else. It was definitely part of the experience (and it makes a better story to tell).

Backpackers!